sapphrikah:

hardliqz:

The Refutation of “Good Hair” is a powerful new project by the brilliant Nakeya B. In this series, Nakeya has chosen to explore the literal meaning of the historically used phrase “good hair”. In her own words, “In each image a woman of color is seen poised upright while consuming a handful of hair. Accompanying the portraits are a selection still life arrangements placing hair and traditional African-American cuisine in the same setting. Doing such suggests “good hair” is nothing more than something to be consumed as if it were food”.

Yes.

interesting!

sapphrikah:

hardliqz:

The Refutation of “Good Hair” is a powerful new project by the brilliant Nakeya B. In this series, Nakeya has chosen to explore the literal meaning of the historically used phrase “good hair”. In her own words, “In each image a woman of color is seen poised upright while consuming a handful of hair. Accompanying the portraits are a selection still life arrangements placing hair and traditional African-American cuisine in the same setting. Doing such suggests “good hair” is nothing more than something to be consumed as if it were food”.

Yes.

interesting!

(via cestlafemmenoire)

doncarlosi:

makenzieears:

humanflower:

Irina Werning, Back to the future

Coolest photography project ever.

The last one’s very powerful actually.

(via thatfunnygirllauren)

memoriesofamnesia:

Color photographs of Egypt, circa 1920.

Autochromes taken by Gervais Courtellemont and W. Robert Moore for National Geographic.

my favorite place

(via bhagyawati)

timelightbox:

A new show at the International Center of Photography in New York rediscovers the work of Russian-born photographer Roman Vishniac. See the photographs here on LightBox.

timelightbox:

A new show at the International Center of Photography in New York rediscovers the work of Russian-born photographer Roman Vishniac. See the photographs here on LightBox.

photojojo:

Put this in a studio STAT. How cool is this for a photo backdrop?

It’s a lamp installation for Ikea in Lisbon. The guys from LikeArchitects used 1200 light bulbs to make it!

Ikea Light Installation in Lisbon

nprfreshair:

All these moments happened — and were captured by photographers — this year.
The Atlantic’s In Focus blog has its annual round-up of the best pictures from the year and it’s an amazing gallery. - Nell

nprfreshair:

All these moments happened — and were captured by photographers — this year.

The Atlantic’s In Focus blog has its annual round-up of the best pictures from the year and it’s an amazing gallery. - Nell

antieverythingism:

Egypt.
reuters:

An Egyptian holds a candle and at Tahrir Square, the focal point of the Egyptian uprising, in Cairo December 31, 2011. Egyptians held a ceremony in Cairo’s Tahrir Square to commemorate those killed during and after the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak’s regime. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

reuters:

An Egyptian holds a candle and at Tahrir Square, the focal point of the Egyptian uprising, in Cairo December 31, 2011. Egyptians held a ceremony in Cairo’s Tahrir Square to commemorate those killed during and after the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak’s regime. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

(via soupsoup)

8935:

… “Remember 2011” ….

8935:

… “Remember 2011” ….

pali-girl:

foreverpalestine:

The Palestinian flag raised @ Tahrir Sq. (Egypt’s 2nd revolution) 11/2011 by A.Hussein on Flickr.

3la rasi w 3eeni ilsha3b ilmasri :)

fotojournalismus:

Iraq’s Youngest Photographer 

(via Reuters)

Qamar Hashim is an 8-year-old Iraqi photographer. He tours famous streets to picture Baghdadis with his single camera and is the youngest Iraqi photographer to win several local awards, according to the Iraqi Society Photographic (ISP).

Below, Qamar responds to a series of questions.


  • When did you take your first photograph and what did it show?

I do not remember exactly the first picture but I had been mimicking my father since I was 4 or 5 years-old and started to take pictures of the Tigris river, the gulls, birds, old houses and heritage places.

  • Why do you think photography is important?

Photography is very important. It documents life and pauses time. We can show the city, life and the people.

  • What do you want to show people about Iraq?

I want to say through my pictures that Iraq is precious and Iraqis are very kind. Iraq is peaceful and has a great history.

  • How do you feel about the U.S. troops leaving Iraq?

I am afraid of the U.S. soldiers, they destroyed the house my family rented in 2003, when I was a fetus. Thank God my family survived and I am happy now for their departure. I am free and not afraid of their tanks.

  • What do you want to be when you finish school?

I like to act and I would like to be a child-activist.

  • Which is your favorite photo you have taken and why?

My favorite picture is of a man sleeping who sells books at al-Mutanabi street. Also a picture of a bee on a rose, I ran a lot to follow the bee until I got this picture.

  • Are there any photographers you look up to?

There a lot of good photographers and I learned from them (Adel Qassim, Fouad Shakir, Kareem al-Ba’aj, and Hameed Majeed).

  • Are there any photos you wish to take but haven’t been able to yet?

The dangerous pictures like fire, blasts, other incidents but I have been sent off the site. They say I am a child. Also I wish to get a picture of the triangle of migrant birds.

  • What does the future of Iraq look like?

I see a flourishing future for Iraq especially when my family owns a house. I love Iraq, my home, and it is more precious than anything else.

WOAH. he’s 8. and he’s won awards. mindblown.

(via layalnoureddine)

i like to take pictures with a nikon so people think i actually look like that in real life.

i like to take pictures with a nikon so people think i actually look like that in real life.

(via perfectbucketlist)

"For me, the strength of photography lies in its ability to evoke humanity. If war is an attempt to negate humanity, then photography can be perceived as the opposite of war."

 James Nachtwey (via fotojournalismus)

(via fotojournalismus)