Muslim Brotherhood ‘paying gangs to go out and rape women and beat men protesting in Egypt’ as thousands of demonstrators pour on to the streets 
Activists claim there have been nearly 20 attacks in the last 10 days 
Country has seen rise in mob sex attacks on protestors in the last year
Demonstrators in Tahrir Square yesterday protested against a draft constitution approved by allies of President Morsi
Muslim Brotherhood today marched in support of the president 
By Ruth Whitehead
 PUBLISHED: 07:37 EST, 1 December 2012  |  UPDATED: 16:31 EST, 1 December 2012 
Egypt’s ruling party is paying gangs of thugs to sexually assault women protesting in Cairo’s Tahrir Square against President Mohamed Morsi, activists said.
They also said the Muslim Brotherhood is paying gangs to beat up men who are taking part in the latest round of protests, which followed a decree by President Morsi to give himself sweeping new powers.
It comes as the Muslim Brotherhood co-ordinated a demonstration today in support of President Mohamed Morsi, who is rushing through a constitution to try to defuse opposition fury over his newly expanded powers.
Scroll down for video
Danger: women protesting in Cairo’s Tahrir Square face the increased danger of sexual assault by large gangs of men

Egyptian supporters of Muslim Brotherhood taking part in a demonstration near Cairo University, in Cairo, in support of President Mohamed Morsi’s recent constitutional declaration

Just 24 hours earlier around 200,000 people gathered in Tahrir Square, the heart of last year’s revolution which toppled President Hosni Mubarak, yesterday to protest against a new draft constitution. 
Large marches from around Cairo flowed into the square, chanting ‘Constitution: Void!’ and The people want to bring down the regime.’
But amid the calls for democracy a sinister threat has emerged.
Magda Adly, the director of the Nadeem Centre for Human Rights, said that under Mubarak, the Government paid thugs to beat male protestors and sexually assault women.
'This is still happening now,' she told The Times. 'I believe thugs are being paid money to do this … the Muslim Brotherhood have the same political approaches as Mubarak,' she said.
RAW VIDEO: Egyptian Protests continue into the night:
Huge rally: Tens of thousands of Islamists demonstrated in Cairo today in support of Morsi

Devout: Muslim Brotherhood supporters perform a prayer as they stage a rally in front of Cairo’s University

One protestor, Yasmine, told the newspaper how she had been in the square filming the demonstrations for a few hours when the crowd suddenly turned.
Before she knew what was happening, about 50 men had surrounded her and began grabbing her breasts. She said they ripped off her clothes, starting with her headscarf and for nearly an hour, indecently assaulted her with their hands.
A few men tried to help her but they were beaten away. Eventually some residents who had seen the attack from their windows came to her aid and an elderly couple pulled her into their home. She suffered internal injuries and was unable to walk for a week.
Four of Yasmine’s friends were also sexually assaulted in the square that day, in the summer.
Show of force: Today’s rally, organized by the Muslim Brotherhood, are an attempt to counteract large opposition protests held earlier this week by liberal and secular groups

Protest: liberal opponents of President Morsi took to the streets yesterday angry at his decision to grant himself sweeping new powers

Afaf el-Sayed, a journalist and activist, told the newspaper she was assaulted by a group of men while protesting in Tahrir Square just over a month ago and she was sure her attackers were ‘thugs from the Muslim Brotherhood’. 
In February 2011 the correspondent for the American network CBS, Lara Logan,endured a half-hour sexual assault in Tahrir Square by a group of men. She said after the ordeal that she had been ‘raped with their hands’. 
While the exact frequency of these attacks is unknown, activists have reported nearly 20 attacks in the last ten days and say there has been a dramatic increase in mob sex attacks on protestors in the last year.
Most attacks take place in one particular corner of the square, at roughly the same time every evening, and usually starts with a group of men forming a human chain around women as if to protect them.
Sit in: Anti-Morsi protesters gather in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Friday night

Terror: CBS Correspondent Lara Logan described her assault by a mob in Tahrir Square as being ‘raped with their hands’. This photo was taken moments before the attack

Yasmine said she was almost sure the assault was planned. She managed to throw her camera to a friend and was able to watch the footage later. She told The Times: ‘Just before the attack it looks like men are getting into position. They look like they’re up to something, they don’t look like random protestors.’
The newspaper spoke to two men who admitted they were paid to target female protestors. Victor and Tutu, both in their thirties, said they operate in a group of around 65 local men and got paid between £10 and £20 a time. But they would not reveal who pays them.
'We're told to go out and sexually harass girls so they leave the demonstration,' Victor told The Times. He said the aim was to cause disruption and instil fear in protesters. He said members of the public sometimes joined in. 
Protestors in Tahrir Square yesterday angrily vowed to bring down a draft constitution approved by allies of President Morsi.
Face-off: Some demonstrators yesterday wore masks, such as this man, who has an ‘anonymous’ mask on the back of his head similar to those worn by Occupy protestors in the US last year

Religious liberty: although this protestor holds up a Qu’ran and a crucifix, human rights groups warn that the draft constitution is bad news for minorities in Egypt such as the Coptic Christian community

The protests have highlighted an increasingly united opposition leadership of prominent liberal and secular politicians trying to direct public anger against Morsi and the Islamists - a contrast to the leaderless youth uprising last year which toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak.
Figures from a new leadership coalition took the stage to address the crowds. The coalition, known as the National Salvation Front, includes prominent democracy advocate Nobel Peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei, leftist Hamdeen Sabbahi and former Arab League chief Amr Moussa.
'We are determined to continue with all peaceful means, whatever it takes to defend our legitimate rights,' ElBaradei told the crowd. He later posted on Twitter that Morsi and his allies are “staging a coup against democracy” and that the regime's legitimacy 'is eroding'.
Sabbahi vowed protests would go on until ‘we topple the constitution’.
The opposition announced plans for an intensified street campaign of protests and civil disobedience and even a possible march on Morsi’s presidential palace to prevent him from calling a nationwide referendum on the draft, which it must pass to come into effect. Top judges announced Friday they may refuse to monitor any referendum, rendering it invalid.
Oppression: An anti-Morsi protester chains his hands during yesterday’s demonstrations, to symbolise the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood

A protester in a Pharaoh headdress holds up a placard reading ‘no to a dictator’ during a demonstration on Tahrir Square on Friday

If a referendum is called, ‘we will go to him at the palace and topple him,’ insisted one protester, Yasser Said, a businessman who said he voted for Morsi in last summer’s presidential election.
Islamists, however, are gearing up as well. The Muslim Brotherhood drummed up supporters for its own mass rally today and boasted the turnout would show that the public supports Morsi’s efforts to push through a constitution.
Brotherhood activists in several cities handed out fliers calling for people to come out and “support Islamic law”. A number of Muslim clerics in Friday sermons in the southern city of Assiut called the president’s opponents “enemies of God and Islam”. 
The week-long unrest has already seen clashes between Islamists and the opposition that left two dead and hundreds injured. On Friday, Morsi opponents and supporters rained stones and firebombs on each other in the cities of Alexandria and Luxor.
Struggle: opponents of President Morsi vowed to keep fighting until the constitution rushed through by the Government is thrown out

Supporters of Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi chant pro-Morsi slogans during a protest in front of the Sultan Hassan and Refaie Mosques’ at the old town in Cairo on Friday

The Islamist-led assembly that worked on the draft for months passed it in a rushed, 16-hour session that lasted until sunrise on Friday.
The vote was abruptly moved up to pass the draft before Egypt’s Constitutional Court rules on Sunday whether to dissolve the assembly. Liberal, secular and Christian members and secular members had already quit the council to protest what they call Islamists’ hijacking of the process.
The draft was to be sent to Morsi today to decide on a date for a referendum, possibly in mid-December.
The draft has a distinctive Islamic bent - enough to worry many that civil liberties could be restricted, though its provisions for enforcing Sharia, or Islamic law, are not as firm as ultra-conservatives wished.
Protests were first sparked when Morsi last week issued decrees granting himself sweeping powers that neutralized the judiciary. Morsi said the move was needed to stop the courts - where anti-Islamist or Mubarak-era judges hold many powerful posts - from dissolving the assembly and further delaying Egypt’s transition.
Opponents, however, accused Morsi of grabbing near-dictatorial powers by sidelining the one branch of government he doesn’t control.


honestly, i don’t understand why people still defend Morsi and the MB

Muslim Brotherhood ‘paying gangs to go out and rape women and beat men protesting in Egypt’ as thousands of demonstrators pour on to the streets

  • Activists claim there have been nearly 20 attacks in the last 10 days
  • Country has seen rise in mob sex attacks on protestors in the last year
  • Demonstrators in Tahrir Square yesterday protested against a draft constitution approved by allies of President Morsi
  • Muslim Brotherhood today marched in support of the president

By Ruth Whitehead

|

Egypt’s ruling party is paying gangs of thugs to sexually assault women protesting in Cairo’s Tahrir Square against President Mohamed Morsi, activists said.

They also said the Muslim Brotherhood is paying gangs to beat up men who are taking part in the latest round of protests, which followed a decree by President Morsi to give himself sweeping new powers.

It comes as the Muslim Brotherhood co-ordinated a demonstration today in support of President Mohamed Morsi, who is rushing through a constitution to try to defuse opposition fury over his newly expanded powers.

Scroll down for video

Danger: women protesting in Cairo's Tahrir Square face the increased danger of sexual assault by large gangs of men

Danger: women protesting in Cairo’s Tahrir Square face the increased danger of sexual assault by large gangs of men

Egyptian supporters of Muslim Brotherhood taking part in a demonstration near Cairo University, in Cairo, in support of President Mohamed Morsi's recent constitutional declaration

Egyptian supporters of Muslim Brotherhood taking part in a demonstration near Cairo University, in Cairo, in support of President Mohamed Morsi’s recent constitutional declaration

Just 24 hours earlier around 200,000 people gathered in Tahrir Square, the heart of last year’s revolution which toppled President Hosni Mubarak, yesterday to protest against a new draft constitution.

Large marches from around Cairo flowed into the square, chanting ‘Constitution: Void!’ and The people want to bring down the regime.’

But amid the calls for democracy a sinister threat has emerged.

Magda Adly, the director of the Nadeem Centre for Human Rights, said that under Mubarak, the Government paid thugs to beat male protestors and sexually assault women.

'This is still happening now,' she told The Times. 'I believe thugs are being paid money to do this … the Muslim Brotherhood have the same political approaches as Mubarak,' she said.

RAW VIDEO: Egyptian Protests continue into the night:

Huge rally: Tens of thousands of Islamists demonstrated in Cairo today in support of Morsi

Huge rally: Tens of thousands of Islamists demonstrated in Cairo today in support of Morsi

Devout: Muslim Brotherhood supporters perform a prayer as they stage a rally in front of Cairo's University

Devout: Muslim Brotherhood supporters perform a prayer as they stage a rally in front of Cairo’s University

One protestor, Yasmine, told the newspaper how she had been in the square filming the demonstrations for a few hours when the crowd suddenly turned.

Before she knew what was happening, about 50 men had surrounded her and began grabbing her breasts. She said they ripped off her clothes, starting with her headscarf and for nearly an hour, indecently assaulted her with their hands.

A few men tried to help her but they were beaten away. Eventually some residents who had seen the attack from their windows came to her aid and an elderly couple pulled her into their home. She suffered internal injuries and was unable to walk for a week.

Four of Yasmine’s friends were also sexually assaulted in the square that day, in the summer.

Show of force: Today's rally, organized by the Muslim Brotherhood, are an attempt to counteract large opposition protests held earlier this week by liberal and secular groups

Show of force: Today’s rally, organized by the Muslim Brotherhood, are an attempt to counteract large opposition protests held earlier this week by liberal and secular groups

Protest: liberal opponents of President Morsi took to the streets yesterday angry at his decision to grant himself sweeping new powers

Protest: liberal opponents of President Morsi took to the streets yesterday angry at his decision to grant himself sweeping new powers

Afaf el-Sayed, a journalist and activist, told the newspaper she was assaulted by a group of men while protesting in Tahrir Square just over a month ago and she was sure her attackers were ‘thugs from the Muslim Brotherhood’.

In February 2011 the correspondent for the American network CBS, Lara Logan,endured a half-hour sexual assault in Tahrir Square by a group of men. She said after the ordeal that she had been ‘raped with their hands’.

While the exact frequency of these attacks is unknown, activists have reported nearly 20 attacks in the last ten days and say there has been a dramatic increase in mob sex attacks on protestors in the last year.

Most attacks take place in one particular corner of the square, at roughly the same time every evening, and usually starts with a group of men forming a human chain around women as if to protect them.

Sit in: Anti-Morsi protesters gather in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Friday night

Sit in: Anti-Morsi protesters gather in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Friday night

Terror: CBS Correspondent Lara Logan described her assault by a mob in Tahrir Square as being 'raped with their hands'. This photo was taken moments before the attack

Terror: CBS Correspondent Lara Logan described her assault by a mob in Tahrir Square as being ‘raped with their hands’. This photo was taken moments before the attack

Yasmine said she was almost sure the assault was planned. She managed to throw her camera to a friend and was able to watch the footage later. She told The Times: ‘Just before the attack it looks like men are getting into position. They look like they’re up to something, they don’t look like random protestors.’

The newspaper spoke to two men who admitted they were paid to target female protestors. Victor and Tutu, both in their thirties, said they operate in a group of around 65 local men and got paid between £10 and £20 a time. But they would not reveal who pays them.

'We're told to go out and sexually harass girls so they leave the demonstration,' Victor told The Times. He said the aim was to cause disruption and instil fear in protesters. He said members of the public sometimes joined in. 

Protestors in Tahrir Square yesterday angrily vowed to bring down a draft constitution approved by allies of President Morsi.

Face-off: Some protestors yesterday wore masks, such as this man, who has an 'anonymous' mask on the back of his head

Face-off: Some demonstrators yesterday wore masks, such as this man, who has an ‘anonymous’ mask on the back of his head similar to those worn by Occupy protestors in the US last year

Religious liberty: although this protestor holds up a Qu'ran and a crucifix, human rights groups warn that the draft constitution is bad news for minorities in Egypt such as the Coptic Christian community

Religious liberty: although this protestor holds up a Qu’ran and a crucifix, human rights groups warn that the draft constitution is bad news for minorities in Egypt such as the Coptic Christian community

The protests have highlighted an increasingly united opposition leadership of prominent liberal and secular politicians trying to direct public anger against Morsi and the Islamists - a contrast to the leaderless youth uprising last year which toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

Figures from a new leadership coalition took the stage to address the crowds. The coalition, known as the National Salvation Front, includes prominent democracy advocate Nobel Peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei, leftist Hamdeen Sabbahi and former Arab League chief Amr Moussa.

'We are determined to continue with all peaceful means, whatever it takes to defend our legitimate rights,' ElBaradei told the crowd. He later posted on Twitter that Morsi and his allies are “staging a coup against democracy” and that the regime's legitimacy 'is eroding'.

Sabbahi vowed protests would go on until ‘we topple the constitution’.

The opposition announced plans for an intensified street campaign of protests and civil disobedience and even a possible march on Morsi’s presidential palace to prevent him from calling a nationwide referendum on the draft, which it must pass to come into effect. Top judges announced Friday they may refuse to monitor any referendum, rendering it invalid.

Imprisonment: An anti-Morsi protester chains his hands during yesterday's demonstrations, to symbolise the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood

Oppression: An anti-Morsi protester chains his hands during yesterday’s demonstrations, to symbolise the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood

A protester in a Pharaoh headdress holds up a placard reading 'no to a dictator' during a demonstration on Tahrir Squareon Friday

A protester in a Pharaoh headdress holds up a placard reading ‘no to a dictator’ during a demonstration on Tahrir Square on Friday

If a referendum is called, ‘we will go to him at the palace and topple him,’ insisted one protester, Yasser Said, a businessman who said he voted for Morsi in last summer’s presidential election.

Islamists, however, are gearing up as well. The Muslim Brotherhood drummed up supporters for its own mass rally today and boasted the turnout would show that the public supports Morsi’s efforts to push through a constitution.

Brotherhood activists in several cities handed out fliers calling for people to come out and “support Islamic law”. A number of Muslim clerics in Friday sermons in the southern city of Assiut called the president’s opponents “enemies of God and Islam”.

The week-long unrest has already seen clashes between Islamists and the opposition that left two dead and hundreds injured. On Friday, Morsi opponents and supporters rained stones and firebombs on each other in the cities of Alexandria and Luxor.

Struggle: opponents of President Morsi vowed to keep fighting until the constitution rushed through by the Government is thrown out

Struggle: opponents of President Morsi vowed to keep fighting until the constitution rushed through by the Government is thrown out

Supporters of Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi chant pro-Morsi slogans during a protest in front of the Sultan Hassan and Refaie Mosques' at the old town in Cairo on Friday

Supporters of Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi chant pro-Morsi slogans during a protest in front of the Sultan Hassan and Refaie Mosques’ at the old town in Cairo on Friday

The Islamist-led assembly that worked on the draft for months passed it in a rushed, 16-hour session that lasted until sunrise on Friday.

The vote was abruptly moved up to pass the draft before Egypt’s Constitutional Court rules on Sunday whether to dissolve the assembly. Liberal, secular and Christian members and secular members had already quit the council to protest what they call Islamists’ hijacking of the process.

The draft was to be sent to Morsi today to decide on a date for a referendum, possibly in mid-December.

The draft has a distinctive Islamic bent - enough to worry many that civil liberties could be restricted, though its provisions for enforcing Sharia, or Islamic law, are not as firm as ultra-conservatives wished.

Protests were first sparked when Morsi last week issued decrees granting himself sweeping powers that neutralized the judiciary. Morsi said the move was needed to stop the courts - where anti-Islamist or Mubarak-era judges hold many powerful posts - from dissolving the assembly and further delaying Egypt’s transition.

Opponents, however, accused Morsi of grabbing near-dictatorial powers by sidelining the one branch of government he doesn’t control.

honestly, i don’t understand why people still defend Morsi and the MB

nadiamounier:

A year to pass.Cairo writings : 18/11. GO TO TAHRIRTaken yesterday. — at Helwan Metro Station.

nadiamounier:

A year to pass.
Cairo writings : 18/11. GO TO TAHRIR
Taken yesterday.
— at Helwan Metro Station.

(via akio)

i’m not really sure WHY people are cheering for MORSI. people did not spend a good year risking and losing their lives to elect a theocratic president with no fucking clue of what democracy really means.

el-masreya:

Egyptian supercat! (Taken with Instagram)

el-masreya:

Egyptian supercat! (Taken with Instagram)

shortformblog:

After those reports, his lawyers and Egypt’s ruling military generals said Mr. Mubarak was in critical condition, but alive. On Wednesday, security officials said that Mr. Mubarak was alive and breathing on his own. They described his condition as nearly stable.

 The former president’s health has been a source of constant speculation and suspicion since his imprisonment. Mr. Mubarak has had health problems for years, but the flood of reports and scares in recent weeks led many Egyptians to believe that the military rulers, determined to move Mr. Mubarak out of a notorious prison, were using those accounts to prepare the public for such a move.

Low ranking security officers, speaking on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals, speculated that the previous night’s reports that Mr. Mubarak was on the edge of death were part of a scheme to transport him out of Egypt for care. Indeed, many Egyptians on Wednesday wondered if the state news agency reports of his near death were all a morbid hoax.

A bizarre situation, certainly, whatever it was.

wut is going on in my country

Mohamed ElBaradei Pulls Out of Egypt’s Presidential Race

globalproxy:

The Nobel Prize winner said his decision was in protest of the military’s failure to put Egypt on the path to democracy.

http://dlvr.it/157sLZ

GOOD IDEA BARADEI. wut is this. i can’t deal.

fyeahafrica:

Women of Tahrir: Frustration at revolution’s failures
It was a photograph that shocked the world - an Egyptian military policeman beating a protester in a hijab with sticks and dragging her along the street so that her clothes were torn open. It seemed to symbolise the vulnerability of women in a society that has changed little since last year’s revolution.
Many Egyptian women felt they had few rights or protections under President Hosni Mubarak, but the sense of liberation after he fell raised many women’s hopes.
Although they were in the front line alongside men during the revolution, a year on there is a clear sense of disappointment felt by many women.
The woman in that photo was taking part in a sit-in near Tahrir Square in December when the military police attacked the protesters.
Local human rights watchdogs accused the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (Scaf), currently ruling Egypt, of systematically targeting women in the square to make them think twice before taking to the street again.
This wasn’t the first time women had been violently mistreated by the military police.
A month earlier a similar thing happened to Nada Zatouna, an independent filmmaker who was filming clashes between protesters and the police near Tahrir Square when she was attacked and arrested.
(continue reading)

fyeahafrica:

Women of Tahrir: Frustration at revolution’s failures

It was a photograph that shocked the world - an Egyptian military policeman beating a protester in a hijab with sticks and dragging her along the street so that her clothes were torn open. It seemed to symbolise the vulnerability of women in a society that has changed little since last year’s revolution.

Many Egyptian women felt they had few rights or protections under President Hosni Mubarak, but the sense of liberation after he fell raised many women’s hopes.

Although they were in the front line alongside men during the revolution, a year on there is a clear sense of disappointment felt by many women.

The woman in that photo was taking part in a sit-in near Tahrir Square in December when the military police attacked the protesters.

Local human rights watchdogs accused the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (Scaf), currently ruling Egypt, of systematically targeting women in the square to make them think twice before taking to the street again.

This wasn’t the first time women had been violently mistreated by the military police.

A month earlier a similar thing happened to Nada Zatouna, an independent filmmaker who was filming clashes between protesters and the police near Tahrir Square when she was attacked and arrested.

(continue reading)

(Source: )


#NoSCAF
ykhxo:

Masr, Om el donia.
Proud Egyptian :) 

ykhxo:

Masr, Om el donia.

Proud Egyptian :) 

(via egyptianmuslima4life-deactivate)

junnyjeenisfreedom:

بلادي ليلة رأس السنة, التحرير (by Aldjabha)

#sonofthenile:

New Year’s celebration in Tahrir Square Cairo, Egypt :)

(via sonofthenile-deactivated2012052)

reuters:

An Egyptian holds a candle and at Tahrir Square, the focal point of the Egyptian uprising, in Cairo December 31, 2011. Egyptians held a ceremony in Cairo’s Tahrir Square to commemorate those killed during and after the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak’s regime. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

reuters:

An Egyptian holds a candle and at Tahrir Square, the focal point of the Egyptian uprising, in Cairo December 31, 2011. Egyptians held a ceremony in Cairo’s Tahrir Square to commemorate those killed during and after the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak’s regime. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

(via soupsoup)

Samira Ibrahim, who says she was humiliated and tortured by the  military, flashes a victory sign after the court ruling in Cairo  yesterday. Photograph: Ahmed Ali/AP
'Virginity Tests' on Egypt protesters are illegal, says judge

The 25-year-old marketing manager, who said she faced death threats  for bringing the case, told CNN: “Justice has been served today.
"These  tests are a crime and also do not comply with the constitution, which  states equality between men and women. I will not give up my rights as a  woman or a human being."
Ibrahim said her treatment showed the tests were intended to “degrade the protesters.
"The  military tortured me, labelled me a prostitute and humiliated me by  forcing on me a virginity test conducted by a male doctor where my body  was fully exposed while military soldiers watched."
After the  verdict she and others, including the presidential candidate and former  broadcaster Bothaina Kamel, marched to Tahrir Square. Ibrahim was later  photographed at Kaser el Nil bridge flashing the victory sign.
Almost in conjunction with the administrative court ruling, it was  announced that the military doctor who undertook the tests would be  referred to a military court on 3 January.
He is being charged with public indecency and disobeying military orders, but not sexual assault.

Samira Ibrahim, who says she was  humiliated and tortured by the military, flashes a victory sign after  the court ruling in Cairo yesterday. Photograph: Ahmed Ali/AP

Forced “virginity tests” on female detainees were ruled illegal in Egypt on Tuesday, after a court ordered an end to the practice.
Hundreds  of activists were in the Cairo courtroom to hear the judge, Aly Fekry,  say the army could not use the test on women held in military prisons in  a case filed by Samira Ibrahim, one of seven women subjected to the  test after being arrested in Tahrir Square during a protest on 9 March.
Fekry,  head of the Cairo administrative court, decreed that what happened to  Ibrahim and six other detainees was illegal and any similar occurrence  in the future would also be considered illegal.
The court is  expected to issue a further injunction against such tests and decree  that the test was completely illegal, opening the door for financial  compensation.
After the verdict Ibrahim, 25, posted on Twitter:  “Thank you to the people, thank you to Tahrir Square that taught me to  challenge, thank you to the revolution that taught me perseverance.”
"The  military had been denying they were doing the tests, then they said it  was a standard procedure and came up with lots of excuses about why they  were doing it."
The head of the judicial military authority,  General Adel Morsy, was cited in state-owned Al-Ahram newspaper as  saying that the administrative court ruling could not be implemented  because there was nothing in the statutes that govern military prisons  about permitting the carrying out of virginity tests. Ibrahim will  return to court in February, to appeal against the one-year suspended  sentence she received for insulting authorities and participating in an  unauthorised assembly in March.
The case brings to the fore protester complaints against military actions during the transitional period.
There  is a long list of violations attributed to the military, with some  12,000 civilians being charged and sentenced in military courts, and  numerous incidents that have led to deaths of protesters.
Almost  in conjunction with the administrative court ruling, it was announced  that the military doctor who undertook the tests would be referred to a  military court on 3 January.
He is being charged with public indecency and disobeying military orders, but not sexual assault.
Hossam  Bahgat, the head of Egyptian initiative for personal rights (EIPR),  said: “To call it a medical checkup is disingenuous. It was torture and  sexual assault.
"It wasn’t conducted in a medical clinic, but in  full view of the soldiers, hence why the charge is one of public  indecency, which is incorrect?
"The military doctor being charged  is a scapegoat, because these soldiers follow orders and what happened  to the detainees is the responsibility of those running the prison."
Ibrahim,  in recounting her ordeal to Human Rights Watch, said two officers had  entered the prison cell, where the women were detained, and asked which  of them were married.
The officers informed them they would be subjected to virginity tests to confirm they were not lying.
"They  took us out one by one … they took me to a bed in a passageway in front  of the cell. There were lots of soldiers around and they could see me.
"I asked if the soldiers could move away and the officer escorting me teased me.
"A  woman prison guard in plainclothes stood at my head and then a man in  military uniform examined me with his hand for several minutes. It was  painful. He took his time."
The case was heard in the first  circuit of the administrative court, known as the rights and freedoms  circuit, and was filed by three Egyptian rights advocacy groups – EIPR,  the Hisham Mubarak law centre and the Nadeem centre for the  rehabilitation of victims of torture.However, the court ruling is an  administrative one only, and because of the provisions of the military  penal code the chances of pursuing criminal liability against the  transgressors lies only within the jurisdiction of military  courts.Campaign groups have been documenting the escalation in sexual  violence towards female demonstrators and claim brutal tactics are used  are to deter, intimidate and humiliate those taking part in political  activities.
Last week Nadya Khalife, from Human Rights Watch,  said: “Images of military and police who strip, grope, and beat  protesters have horrified the world and brought into sharp focus the  sexual brutality Egyptian women face in public life. At this crucial  stage in Egypt’s history, women need to be able to take part in  demonstrations and elections without fear. “Security forces’ disgraceful  attacks and the government’s broader failure to address sexual violence  and harassment do not bode well for Egypt’s women.”
The New Woman  Foundation, in Egypt, said at least nine women were arrested during a  protest in November, with some accusing security forces of physical and  verbal assault.

Samira Ibrahim, who says she was humiliated and tortured by the military, flashes a victory sign after the court ruling in Cairo yesterday. Photograph: Ahmed Ali/AP

'Virginity Tests' on Egypt protesters are illegal, says judge

The 25-year-old marketing manager, who said she faced death threats for bringing the case, told CNN: “Justice has been served today.

"These tests are a crime and also do not comply with the constitution, which states equality between men and women. I will not give up my rights as a woman or a human being."

Ibrahim said her treatment showed the tests were intended to “degrade the protesters.

"The military tortured me, labelled me a prostitute and humiliated me by forcing on me a virginity test conducted by a male doctor where my body was fully exposed while military soldiers watched."

After the verdict she and others, including the presidential candidate and former broadcaster Bothaina Kamel, marched to Tahrir Square. Ibrahim was later photographed at Kaser el Nil bridge flashing the victory sign.

Almost in conjunction with the administrative court ruling, it was announced that the military doctor who undertook the tests would be referred to a military court on 3 January.

He is being charged with public indecency and disobeying military orders, but not sexual assault.

Samira Ibrahim, who says she was humiliated and tortured by the military, flashes a victory sign after the court ruling in Cairo yesterday. Photograph: Ahmed Ali/AP

Forced “virginity tests” on female detainees were ruled illegal in Egypt on Tuesday, after a court ordered an end to the practice.

Hundreds of activists were in the Cairo courtroom to hear the judge, Aly Fekry, say the army could not use the test on women held in military prisons in a case filed by Samira Ibrahim, one of seven women subjected to the test after being arrested in Tahrir Square during a protest on 9 March.

Fekry, head of the Cairo administrative court, decreed that what happened to Ibrahim and six other detainees was illegal and any similar occurrence in the future would also be considered illegal.

The court is expected to issue a further injunction against such tests and decree that the test was completely illegal, opening the door for financial compensation.

After the verdict Ibrahim, 25, posted on Twitter: “Thank you to the people, thank you to Tahrir Square that taught me to challenge, thank you to the revolution that taught me perseverance.”

"The military had been denying they were doing the tests, then they said it was a standard procedure and came up with lots of excuses about why they were doing it."

The head of the judicial military authority, General Adel Morsy, was cited in state-owned Al-Ahram newspaper as saying that the administrative court ruling could not be implemented because there was nothing in the statutes that govern military prisons about permitting the carrying out of virginity tests. Ibrahim will return to court in February, to appeal against the one-year suspended sentence she received for insulting authorities and participating in an unauthorised assembly in March.

The case brings to the fore protester complaints against military actions during the transitional period.

There is a long list of violations attributed to the military, with some 12,000 civilians being charged and sentenced in military courts, and numerous incidents that have led to deaths of protesters.

Almost in conjunction with the administrative court ruling, it was announced that the military doctor who undertook the tests would be referred to a military court on 3 January.

He is being charged with public indecency and disobeying military orders, but not sexual assault.

Hossam Bahgat, the head of Egyptian initiative for personal rights (EIPR), said: “To call it a medical checkup is disingenuous. It was torture and sexual assault.

"It wasn’t conducted in a medical clinic, but in full view of the soldiers, hence why the charge is one of public indecency, which is incorrect?

"The military doctor being charged is a scapegoat, because these soldiers follow orders and what happened to the detainees is the responsibility of those running the prison."

Ibrahim, in recounting her ordeal to Human Rights Watch, said two officers had entered the prison cell, where the women were detained, and asked which of them were married.

The officers informed them they would be subjected to virginity tests to confirm they were not lying.

"They took us out one by one … they took me to a bed in a passageway in front of the cell. There were lots of soldiers around and they could see me.

"I asked if the soldiers could move away and the officer escorting me teased me.

"A woman prison guard in plainclothes stood at my head and then a man in military uniform examined me with his hand for several minutes. It was painful. He took his time."

The case was heard in the first circuit of the administrative court, known as the rights and freedoms circuit, and was filed by three Egyptian rights advocacy groups – EIPR, the Hisham Mubarak law centre and the Nadeem centre for the rehabilitation of victims of torture.However, the court ruling is an administrative one only, and because of the provisions of the military penal code the chances of pursuing criminal liability against the transgressors lies only within the jurisdiction of military courts.Campaign groups have been documenting the escalation in sexual violence towards female demonstrators and claim brutal tactics are used are to deter, intimidate and humiliate those taking part in political activities.

Last week Nadya Khalife, from Human Rights Watch, said: “Images of military and police who strip, grope, and beat protesters have horrified the world and brought into sharp focus the sexual brutality Egyptian women face in public life. At this crucial stage in Egypt’s history, women need to be able to take part in demonstrations and elections without fear. “Security forces’ disgraceful attacks and the government’s broader failure to address sexual violence and harassment do not bode well for Egypt’s women.”

The New Woman Foundation, in Egypt, said at least nine women were arrested during a protest in November, with some accusing security forces of physical and verbal assault.

pali-girl:

foreverpalestine:

The Palestinian flag raised @ Tahrir Sq. (Egypt’s 2nd revolution) 11/2011 by A.Hussein on Flickr.

3la rasi w 3eeni ilsha3b ilmasri :)
Bruised but defiant: Mona Eltahawy on her assault by Egyptian security forces

'Our dictators tailor wounds to suit their victims’ occupations,' she says.

My phone fell as the four or five riot policemen beat me and then  started to drag me towards no man’s land. “My phone, I have to get my  phone,” I said, and reached down to try to retrieve it. It wasn’t the  Twitterholic in me that threw herself after the phone, but the survivor.  For the first three or four hours of detention, I knew they could do  anything and no one would know. In the event, it was near-miraculous  that, while I was at the ministry, an activist with a smartphone came to  discuss setting up a truce between protesters and security. As soon as  he signed me in to Twitter, I sent out, “beaten arrested at interior  ministry”. And then his phone battery died.
But the hands on my breasts, in between my legs and inside my trousers – that,  I know, happened to me. Sometimes I think of them as ravens plucking at  my body. Calling me a whore. Pulling my hair. All the while beating me.  At one point I fell. Eye-level with their boots, all I thought was:  “Get up or you will die.”

Bruised but defiant: Mona Eltahawy on her assault by Egyptian security forces

'Our dictators tailor wounds to suit their victims’ occupations,' she says.

My phone fell as the four or five riot policemen beat me and then started to drag me towards no man’s land. “My phone, I have to get my phone,” I said, and reached down to try to retrieve it. It wasn’t the Twitterholic in me that threw herself after the phone, but the survivor. For the first three or four hours of detention, I knew they could do anything and no one would know. In the event, it was near-miraculous that, while I was at the ministry, an activist with a smartphone came to discuss setting up a truce between protesters and security. As soon as he signed me in to Twitter, I sent out, “beaten arrested at interior ministry”. And then his phone battery died.

But the hands on my breasts, in between my legs and inside my trousers – that, I know, happened to me. Sometimes I think of them as ravens plucking at my body. Calling me a whore. Pulling my hair. All the while beating me. At one point I fell. Eye-level with their boots, all I thought was: “Get up or you will die.”

(Source: )

OH.MY.GOD. oh really “imam?” he doesn’t deserve that title. what a little effing hypocrite. those “imams” are the people that dirty the name of Islam. and we still give them their platforms and allow them to speak for our religion. it’s disgusting. anyone can just come dillydallying along and call themselves an “imam” or a “sheikh” and tell all the people about some misogynistic fatwa or just plain out monolithic ruling and the culture and tradition in the middle east tells people they have to listen to anyone that just comes along and calls himself a sheik and it just makes me angry.

OH.MY.GOD. oh really “imam?” he doesn’t deserve that title. what a little effing hypocrite. those “imams” are the people that dirty the name of Islam. and we still give them their platforms and allow them to speak for our religion. it’s disgusting. anyone can just come dillydallying along and call themselves an “imam” or a “sheikh” and tell all the people about some misogynistic fatwa or just plain out monolithic ruling and the culture and tradition in the middle east tells people they have to listen to anyone that just comes along and calls himself a sheik and it just makes me angry.